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Another Code: Recollection Review – A Journey into Gaming’s Memories

Another Code: Recollection Review

Nintendo and Arc System Works’ newly released remake of the cult classic Nintendo DS game Another Code and its Wii sequel Another Code: Journey into Lost Memories brings players back to Blood Edward Island for a journey like no other. This highly anticipated remake naturally makes many changes to the original game, which many have called a Nintendo DS tech demo, while also graphically improving the Wii sequel. Does the original Another Code’s premise hold up in the modern age of gaming? Let’s dissect the game piece by piece and see if this game is worth your time and money.

Gameplay – 7/10

Another Code: Recollection Review
Screenshot by Raider King

Another Code: Recollection’s remake of the original Another Code gives the player exactly what they would want from a classic Adventure Game. Once per chapter, the players will find themselves searching through the abandoned Edward mansion to find items and solve mind-teasing puzzles.

These puzzles in turn bring a shocking amount of variety to the game, with almost none of them being identical to each other gameplay-wise. Creating an exciting atmosphere as the player progresses through the mansion.

One complaint I do unfortunately have is with the game’s camera. Because brushing the camera against walls will often push it close to Ashley, your visuals will frequently be obscured. This in combination with how slow the camera actually moves resulted in several occasions where I missed an item I was expected to examine because I couldn’t see it.

The Journey into Lost Memories portions of the game place Another Code firmly into the realm of visual novels. While the game does keep the same structure of having one major puzzle per chapter, each of those chapters is now significantly larger. 

In addition to this, the large cast of characters in Journey into Lost Memories sees the player spend a large amount of the game talking to people and getting immersed in the world of Lake Juliet.

While I do not mind this change (in fact I quite enjoy Journey into Lost Memories), the sudden style shift between games can throw off some players who were expecting constant puzzles similar to franchises like Professor Layton. 

Fun Factor – 7/10

Another Code: Recollection Review
Screenshot by Raider King

The puzzles of both the original Another Code and Journey into Lost Memories portions of the game offer great enjoyment for those who adore the genre.  Offering players one major puzzle to solve per chapter.

Because the original Another Code based many of its puzzles around the original Nintendo DS hardware, requiring players to make use of the two screens to solve them, most puzzles from this portion of the game have been reworked to be solved without them or take advantage of the Switch’s own hardware.

While the puzzles that solely require the player’s brain and good use of items are fun to solve, the few that make use of the Nintendo Switch’s gyro can be a pain. One can only spin a stool for a few seconds before it becomes a frustrating experience.

Aside from this though, exploring the Edward Mansion brought a large smile to my face. Uncovering new areas and unlocking previously locked doors is always an enjoyable experience.

This experience doesn’t last very long however, just like the original game, Recollection’s beginning chapters will take you only a few hours to finish. Making for a short and breezy experience.

While the Journey into Lost Memories portions of the game do not scratch that same itch for me, they are enjoyable in their own right. As a visual novel fan, I was naturally quite invested in seeing how the game’s overarching mysteries played out as I progressed.

Graphics – 8/10

Another Code: Recollection Review
Screenshot by Raider King

Another Code Recollection takes Taisuke Kanasaki’s character designs and translates them into modern 3D models extremely well with a bright, cel-shaded direction. Despite its harsh winter release window, Another Code’s bright color palette and warm shades give the game comforting warm autumn vibes.

The game is also filled with small details which give it an immense charm. Small things like Ashley drawing notes on your map go a long way for enjoyment in my eyes. No other game on the Switch truly resembles Another Code, which helps it stand out and have an identity of its own.

Unfortunately, it must also be noted that although most of the models look great, the chosen art style has failed characters like Dan and Janet. Whose skin tones in the game are a fair shade lighter than in their official art. 

Of course, being a Nintendo Switch release, the game naturally has the occasional blurry texture. This is more noticeable in the Journey into Lost Memories portions of the game as the player will often be walking on a trail texture which stands out like a sore thumb when contrasted with the character models.

Aside from these small issues though, Another Code: Recollection is a beautiful-looking game that is bound to bring up warm memories from fans of the franchise.

Remake Status – 7/10

Another Code: Recollection Review
Screenshot by Raider King

When talking about a game like this, I feel it’s important to compare and contrast its roots. Another Code: Recollection is not a 1:1 remake like its Switch brethren Super Mario RPG and Live a Live. Instead, the game aims to tell the same narrative but through a completely new experience similar to Capcom’s recent Resident Evil Remakes.

These changes go beyond the immediately noticeable ones such as the camera always being behind Ashley. From its very core Another Code: Recollection will give you a different experience from the original game’s with new puzzles, a revamped localization closer to the Japanese text, and rearranged plot details.

Perhaps there is no better way to explain how different the experience will be than with an example. In the original Another Code, the player would receive the lighter during the game’s fourth chapter. In Recollection, you receive the lighter early on in the first chapter and will use it constantly throughout the entire game.

I imagine this will cause controversy among fans of Journey into Lost Memories in particular, as while most people knew the original Another Code would need to be changed in order to be playable on a system with a single screen, these changes carry on over to the Wii sequel.

At the end of the day, it is up to us as individuals to decide on if a remake should remain 1:1 or make compromises to adapt to modern gaming. While I do enjoy the direction Recollection has taken, I do find myself wishing that the original Journey into Lost Memories was available on modern hardware.

Enjoyment – 9/10

Another Code: Recollection Review
Screenshot by Raider King

While I have made many comparisons to the original Another Code throughout this review, I must admit that I am a newcomer to the series who had previously only heard about and seen parts of the original games. 

However, as a newcomer, I feel like I can offer a net medium experience of the game. Many who will be purchasing Another Code: Recollection will be those who had previously never played the franchise. 

For newcomers, Another Code: Recollection offers a grand new experience that will engage them throughout their entire playtime. For veterans, it offers a way to re-experience old summer memories in an entirely new fashion.

7.6 TOTAL SCORE

Another Code: Recollection Review

Nintendo Store Page
Another Code Recollection

The experience may be short and while it may not be placed on many people’s game of the year lists, Another Code Recollection is still worth your time as one of 2024’s early game releases.


Gameplay 7
Fun Factor 7
Graphics 8
Remake Status 7
Enjoyment 9
Based in Pennsylvania, USA, Skeith has been a gamer for over two decades now and has decided to take pen to paper about it. Capable of playing games at incredible speeds, you can rely on them to write about them in record time.
Skeith Ruch
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